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israel's ongoing attack on gaza, the palestinian death toll continues to rise, now topping 20. israel started drafting 30,000 resume troops in a sign the assault may soon widen. we will go to gaza to speak with award winning journalist mohammed omer and to jerusalem where we will be joined by gershon baskin, who has served as a secret negotiator between israel and hamas. then oliver stone's and told history of the and the states. >> it takes an upside-down view of an american history after world war ii and looks at it in a new way. >> the academy award winning filmmaker oliver stone joins us in the studio with his partner peter kuznick to talk about their new book and tv series looking at the classified america we were never meant to see. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. israel is continuing to pound the gaza strip with airstrikes amidst fears that israel could launch a ground invasion. at least 21 palestinians have died in the most recent round of violence while three israelis died on thursday. isra
around our other ally israel, and that instability continues to grow. one of the things that was helpful from egypt while president mubarak was in charge, at least there was some effort to restrict the transfer of rockets into the gaza strip. so there were some tunnels that would be found, the tunnels had to be kept small so they were able to get smaller rockets into gaza. but now that there's a new regime, apparently the bigger rockets are getting in to gaza and they pose more and more of a threat as they continue to be fired into israel. the action is not only the fall of an ally, president mubarak, but the assistance in bringing to power in egypt the muslim brotherhood. they want to see israel gone and they would also not mind seing the united states gone. it's important when formulating foreign policy that the united states, particularly the obama administration, decide, are we going to be assisted with our own personal security issue here in the united states by the actions we take or are the re-- reactions that are going to be caused by our actions actually going to cause greater t
where tension is rising after israel and syria exchange fire across their border. in china, it's all change at the top. we have a special report on how the next generation is determined to tread its own path. >> i would like to be a software engineer. >> so you don't want to do the sort of things that your parents did? >> never. >> hello, it's midday here in london, 7:00 in the morning in washington. there's been a new twist to the sex scandal engulfing the american military top brass there. on friday, general david petraeus resigned as boss of the c.i.a. after it was revealed that he had been having an extra marital affair. now general john alan has been drawn into the scandal after what is being called inappropriate communications with a woman also linked to the affair. he has denied any wrong doing, but his application for a top nato job has been put on hold. >> there will be moments like this -- >> another top american commander, another career threatened. this time it's general john allen. he's in charge of u.s. forces in afghanistan, and he was about to be confirmed as the supr
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> woodruff: israel and hamas agreed to a cease-fire today, ending eight days of deadly conflict. good evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight: we have reports from tel aviv, gaza, and cairo. and ray suarez examines the prospects ahead for the peace deal. >> woodruff: then, margaret warner reports from turkey where the syrian civil war is having an impact along the shared 500 mile border and in ankara. >> with fighting in syrian areas, spilling over into turkish towns, turkey finds itself walking a fine line between defending its interests, and being drawn into a regional war. >> brown: after the deluge: we assess the impact of all the money spent in the most expensive campaign in history. >> woodruff: as recovery costs from superstorm sandy continue to rise,aul solman looks at weather risks and the business of insurance. >> all insurance companies are paying very careful attention to the variability and the volatility in the climate. >> brown: and poet joy harjo celebrates the focal p
viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: after another day of violence, a ceasefire deal between israel and hamas was finally announced in cairo today. but further negotiations on key longer-term sticking points between the two sides were put off for now. egypt's foreign minister, mohammed kamel amr, announced the breakthrough with secretary of state hillary clinton at his side. >> egypt has exerted efforts and conducted intensive discussions since the renewed outbreak of hostilities in the gaza strip with all parties: the palestinian leadership, the these efforts and communications managed to reach an agreement to a ceasefire and the return of calm and halt of the violence and the bloodshed that was witnessed recently. >> the united states welcomes the agreement today for a ceasefire in gaza. for it to hold, the rocket attacks must end, a broader calm returned. in the days ahead, the united states will work with partners across region to consolidate this progess, improve conditions for the people of gaza, provide security for the people of israel. >> woodruff: a short time later this a
deadly fire near the israel/gaza border. they say it's in retaliation for ongoing rocket attacks into southern israel. >> triggered by an air strike that killed the top hamas military commander. sayre -- sara sidner is following the story. >> reporter: you can see gaza behind me. there has been air strike after air strike after air strike. we ourselves witnessed three air strikes, major hit. we could see fire and then three plumes of smoke. since then we've been also seeing and hearing rockets coming over into southern israel. we now know there are three people who have died in israel in an apartment building very near, within a 7 kilometer radius of gaza in israel. we also know that at least seven people have been killed here in gaza and the air strikes are continuing. right now we do and we are watching the funeral happen, of ha the leader of hamas' military wing, that is going on as we speak. thousands of people attending that funeral. a very important figure, someone who people see as one of the founders of hamas, a symbolic member of hamas as well. we are expecting this to c
pretty well in terms of -- from the western perspective in working with israel. he has a lot to prove to the outside world and his own people. >> reporter: now, the obama administration is calling for calm in egypt pushing the leadership there to work together to resolve their differences peacefully and through "democratic dialogue." joe. >> everybody i think is a little stunned about the timing of all of this, dan. is the white house saying anything about whether there's some type of linkage between the timing of the gaza agreement and this move by mohamed morsi? >> reporter: they're not at all. in fact, the white house has been really pushing a lot of the comment on this through the state department which of course as i mentioned a short time ago did release that statement. i think it's really too early to tell. they are watching carefully what the developments are there and will have more comment i suspect as they get more information. >> thanks so much for that, dan lothian at the white house. we're just over two days into the israeli/hamas cease-fire along the gaza border and alr
#% of all the foreign aid that we do, a lot of money. israel, egypt, pakistan, iraq, and afghanistan. nothing wrong with that, but we have to work with our frens to the south. we put in 1.4, and with additional money, it's $1.9 billion. for every one dollar we help with mexico, they spend $13. they spend a lot of money on security. they got to -- we got to understand what they are doing. now, what we started off, we did the easy thing, buy them hell cometters, buying this, and e worked with george bush, and filed the first legislation before bush talked about the plan because i felt that strongly about helping mexico, but nevertheless, we worked together. we did the easy thing with mexico, the helicopters and the planes. the hard part is this is we got to start training or billing the capacity, the prison systems, the prosecutors, the policemen. we're working on it at the federal level, and they trained 36,000 police. i think they need 150,000 or more than that. we have to go into judges, train the judges, the prosecutors. did you know that a prosecutor here in the united states, if
launch lar-sca retaliation, further fueling the conflict. >>> egypt has recalled its ambassador to israel to protest the killing of the hamas military leader. egypt is one of the few arab countries with diplomatic ties to israel. but president mohamed morsi belongs to the muslim brotherhood which has close relations to hamas. morsi has called for an emergency meeting of the arab league to discuss the killing. >>> the leaders of asia's top economies want to work out a free trade agreement. ramin mellegard joins us from the business desk. there are so many trade negotiations going on worldwide. what are the details in this case? >> catherine, representatives of japan, china, and south korea are trying to get together this month to talk about starting negotiations for a free trade pact. the countries have agreed there are benefits to strengthening economic ties as the move towards free trade accelerates worldwide. leaders of the three countries had agreed in may that they would begin the trade negotiations by the end of this year. preparations had been made in working-level meetings but pros
in israel today. that has been pushed to 3:30 eastern. we will take you there once it gets under way. >> james on our 65 and over line. good afternoon, sir. caller: i'm 85-year-old and i was living good up until the last four years off of my retirement. but in the last four years the cost of living has gone up so much that i can't make it. i have to get out and get odd jobs to buy groceries. and this -- the first of this year i got a 1.7 increase in social security and cost of living went up 30% this year. host: what is the biggest thing that cost of living increase affects for you? caller: just about everything i buy. my grashries and gasoline so i go to a doctor and stores host: how old did you say you were? caller: 85. host: so you've been retired for some time. caller: yes. host: let's to -- go to susan in washington. caller: the economy has affected most of us for a number of years as far as i can tell. i've tried to save money to invest it and when i tried to invest it i lost most of what i put in because of what happened at the twin towers and i don't know that the economy is
talks about iran, israel and u.s./middle east policy. and later, a look at the aftermath of the arab spring including the ongoing syrian civil war and the challenges facing egypt after its revolution. >> later today, singers and musicians roger daltrey and pete townsend of the who will be at the national press club to talk about the program they co-founded to help improve the lives of teenagers and young adults with cancer. they'll also discuss their plans for a new initiative called teen cancer america. it aims to set up hospitals and medical centers in the strategic areas across the country. see their remarks live beginning at 1 p.m. eastern over on c-span. >> you're watching c-span2 with politics and public atears. weak dies fee you are -- weekdays featuring live coverage of the senate and every weekend the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs and get our schedule at our web site, and you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> former national security adviser stephen hadley was among the speakers at a recent conference focusing o
and israel. former obama administration released adviser dennis ross is interviewed by former state department spokesman. the talk of sanctions and the administration's approach to that country's nuclear program. this is about 40 minutes. [applause] >> thank you very much. dennis and i have done this a lot of the years, never before an audience. [laughter] when you are the president's foreign-policy spokesman and handing out in the roosevelt room as you have the israeli prime minister and then chairman arafat and the president trying to reach middle east piece you go and say, okay. but we tell the press. look, you can tell them what everyone except for this, this, and this. what else is there? but now we have the dennis two is out of the government. and writing a new book. so if you think about the next four years, clearly how the united states relationship evolves with ron, then the clear issue can be resolved short of conflict will be among those, if not the most pivotal issue facing the president in his second term. so start off, in 2009 when you were at the state department's as
the israel hamas ceasefire. tomorrow on "washington journal," shibley telhami on the latest developments on israel hamas cease-fire. then, poverty in the united states. after that, jacqueline pata discusses with the sequestration and fiscal cliff could mean to native american communities. 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. in 2004, jeff fager took over as executive producer of "60 minutes." last week he spoke to students about journalism and the future of network news. this is just over one hour. >> good evening, everyone. the cronkite school has a special relationship with cbs news. walter cronkite served as the evening news anger for nearly 20 years becoming known as the most trusted man in america for his objective, straightforward reporting. he was the face of cbs. three years after he stepped down from the news anger desk, the school was named in is honored. that grew over the next 25 years. today three years after his passing, he continues to be our guiding light. it is truly a special honor to have jeff fager with us tonight to talk about the traditional values of journalism and how tho
amounts of foreign aid to the state of egypt. egypt is threatening israel. egypt is threatening the region because of the arab spring. we have to rethink the dollars that we are sending to egypt. we have to say that these dollars are for maintaining a security and peace and if you are not participating, you do not get these dollars. that is job one. we have to continue our commitment of foreign policy to israel. israel is our strongest ally and our sister country come and we need to do everything we can fulfill our to fulfill our commitment. all of the foreign aid is spent right here in america un-american jobs. that is when the requirements. we need to gather up our allies and protect the people who serve in our state department we can secure them, they shouldn't be there. >> moderator: i'm going to go forward, but what you think should be the basic guiding principles, speaking a bit more probably? berg: if you are referring to dollars spent, or in general, our foreign policy, america is the leader of the world. we need to look where there are opportunities to create democracies come and
of israel, amazingly strong stateswoman. one of the stateswoman in there. i felt like it was very important. it is interesting. she has a story in the history this based so much on what we would call his book, but pushing her way through things. and try to figure out, was the lesson. i don't want to the -- i didn't want to -- she raised so much money in america, came here looking for money and found millions of dollars to support and help israel grow, but i did not want it to be about fund-raising. i found this one story that i love. she used to invite other statesmen out to her house bury she would bring into her kitchen . and first, it took me awhile. i don't want to say that she's in her kitchen doing things. that's not the lesson. but the reason she brought them there is so that they would see the world on her terms. she brings them to her place. it's funny. i handed it into the editor. he said to me, i have one problem with the book. one of the once you looked at. i said, was the problem? you use one word over and over and over again. a fighter. use the word fighter in almost every ent
before the united states as opposed to israel or neighbors of iran? i think it is possible that we could accept something that the iranians would say we have already picked the japan option. we want to demonstrate we have the technical capabilities, but without the possibility of deploying full weapons systems and we would give assurance to the international community. whether the president used slightly more casual language than he intended that day, i do not know. as for timons, remember -- -- time lines, remember, there are a range of tools being used to interrupt, if you will come in iran -- if you will, to iran as fast track to nuclear capability. its sounds implausible, but we really do not know. the deadline keeps shifting, literally keeps shifting, because the iranians are suffering setbacks within their own time line and that is not always apparent to us. i am not saying it has to be done by a particular year or not. there will always be an external variables that slightly change the dynamics of this. >> ellen, can i add on that? i think the reason 2013, early 2014 is the focus
. israel bombarded the gaza strip with more than 180 airstrikes today. the king of jordan has canceled a visit to britain under the protest there. "the new york times" reporting the pentagon says it could take more than 45,000 troops to contain them. i cannot remember a time of more moving parts in the middle east puzzle than right now on this day. so much is new, and they are all inter-connected. hamas is testing is real. israel is testing egypt. there is more uncertainty about israel and the end of -- the relationship with iran. what is hezbollah doing now that they are involved in their own fights inside syria? the opportunity for turkey to play a role right now. it just is the normans. this is probably the least secure discussion there is. i am reminded of bob dylan's favorite song. i propose we adopted as the anthem. there must be some way out of here. let's aim of for some relief, and maybe a little less confusion. i would like to propose the following format for the beginning of the panel. then i want to open it up for a lot of questions on the floor. i would like to propose our
this panel is syria. but what is happening in israel as we gather here this week? these are the questions of our time. these are the challenges of our generation and. that, i think, is one of the great benefits of opportunities like halifax, to have a very in- depth discussion on how we got as a community -- a community of democracies, a community of countries that care, are compassionate, and are able to do something to stop the slaughter of innocent civilians. >> there were many who say we need to have more young emerging democracies that need to be stepping up to the plate and taking on more of your responsibilities. indonesia, india, brazil, turkey, south africa, but at the same time, we also hear the statements made that as they get involved and should step up to the plate in helping to nurture democracy come to protest human rights, but that they also have to make sure there roadhouses in order. what are your thoughts on that? >> certainly, more nations now have their role to play. definitely, in our case, we're trying to play a role based on our experience. as you might know, our c
in support of morsi's plans. >>> as the truce holds between hamas and israel for if fourth day, president mahmoud abbas is confident. palestinian factions are supporting the effort but the others are opposing it. >>> finally lotto fever. lottery officials say there were no winners in last night's power lottery pushing this week's jackpot to under $425 million. that's the largest jackpot ever for the game. those are your top stories. now back to "fareed zakaria gps." >>> we live in a borderless world, right, where globalization, inper dependence, and economics are reshaping the way companies and countries cooperate. not quite, says robert kaplan. he's written a book called "the revenge of geography: what the map tells us about coming conflicts and the battle of flight." >> he joins me now. you have this terrific book out. explain what the premise is. mine i tried to very briefly do it. >> yeah, the premise is that in all the journals of opinion, all the op-ed pages, it's all about what we can do. we can intervene here. we can change interest rates there. there's lieu ma ee's human agen. th
on in the world. israel and palestine is going up again. you have a lot of things happening. so does this make sense? >> if we had not been in iraq and afghanistan in the last 10 years, his art has a great presence in the pacific. as we look at the importance of the region, as we look at economic growth and we expect to see 50% of economic growth in the coming decade, as we look at the tremendous opportunities that we have, in the context of the china that is rising and economic power, it is clear that make sense rebalance to asia-pacific, even as we continue to engage globally. >> one of the things that is really interesting is that when america was shifting to asia, many of them here said you were going to neglect it. well, at that point, i don't think it was a fair comparison. because i didn't feel that american american resources were stretched to such a point that there is such a zero-sum game between one part of the world on the other. this is not being presented we had an idea about how women can have it all. the answer is no, that there are limits. >> we have continued deep engagements
two rocket launch sites. militants fired another rock neat southern israel. six palestinians have been killed and 30 wounded. for israelis have also been hurt. over in the west bank city of ramallah, they're starting to the process to exhume the body of yasser arafat, the former palestinian president. looking for evidence that they might have been murdered. arafat died in pair ras in 2004 thought to be a blood disease. rumors have circulated for years that he was poisoned and earlier this year, a murder investigation was actually opened in france. want to bring in michael holmes here. you knew yasser arafat well. i had a chance to see him at the white house once during the clinton administration. you sat down at least on six different occasions and got to know this guy. >> i did over the years. i covered the second intefadeh around that time and early 20000, late 1990s and intervi interviewed him a number of time, april '02, surrounded by israeli forces, and we followed a bunch of protesters who defied that, went in to see him, and warning shots were fired in front of our group and beh
a viable independent palestine living side-by-side with a jewish and democratic israel. my longtime friend and colleague ehud barak is here. i knowed he would agree with that as both of the most decorated soldier in israeli history and as a distinguished public servants. i have more to say about this later, but i did want to begin by recognizing the challenge that this will surely present. i want to add my words of welcome to all of you. i want to thank bill for being here -- we reallyvery much appreciate your participation. foreign minister -- a good friend and colleague who is a top global thinker, well deserved because of the careful comprehensive views he has developed over many years of hard work about issues fundamental to freedom. of course, i see right before me a wonderful friend and colleague, former senator john warner, who has been a great example of public service, military and civilian, his entire life. and to all our friends and colleagues from the diplomatic corps, and thanks of course to david and susan and everyone at "foreign policy" for joining with the state department
. >>> and tomorrow they will hammer out the details of the cease-fire with hamas. israel says a delegation with gaza has arrived in cairo. >>> fiscal cliff negotiations kick off this week. today two more republicans who previously refused to consider tax hikes are
's all this controversy about whether or not israel is going to go to war with iran. when president obama spoke about the big yellowbird i don't think he was talking about the big yellowbird i think that he was talking about big bird on tv. chinese oriented people referred to as yellow. china has the largest population on earth, a billion people. they have so many people that the force women to have abortions. they have no respect for human rights at all, and china is friends with iran. china is trading partners with iran. if we have israel go to war with iran, then we are going to have to deal with an angry china, and i think that of really big problem, and we have to put a stop to it and negotiate peace. as i sit in the opening statement, i feel that our biggest problem is the deficit, but i believe that the reason why we haven't been able to lower the national debt is because our political system is broken, and we need to fix it or this will continue whether we have a republican or democrat in the presidency or in the majority of congress, and it is why constitutional amendment with th
relationship. in israel there were some day care centers that had a problem. a problem encountered by day care centers around the world. parents coming late to pick up their children. teachers would have to stay with the children until the late arriving parents came. with the help of some economists, they instituted a fine for the late arriving parents. what do you think happened? [laughter] there were more late arrivals. now, why should this be? according to the standard economic reasoning, charging for something should decrease rather than increase the willingness to consume now. so what happened here? well, something similar to what was going on. before when parents came late, they felt guilty. they were imposing inconvenience on the teachers. but now they treated it as a fee for a service. like hiring a babysitter. and you don't feel guilty when you pay money to the babysitter to perform the duty of looking after your child. the attitudes changed. monetary payment change the relationship between the parent and the day care center and crowd out the sense of obligation to show up on time. wh
israel. if you had a phone with you, you could press a button and legal little trail there. when you showed up you could see that this is what people had done. that starts to be a compelling way of thinking how computers cancer to be more of a conduit of the lenses of your friends in the people you trust and anybody in the world rather than an internet connection with a screen on top of it. >> won the presuppositions of that is that you need a persistent identity that is attached to every person in your life. that has a memory. this thing has to be searchable and be in place over all the times in troops and things. the uc that as a novel view of identity or are you replicating something that is occurring in the real world? >> so phones are something you have with you all the time. you only have one phone and you do not share with people. your the one person who uses your phone unless you are sharing some 1's photograph. it contains all your information. the applications you use. facebook, we think about it as an opportunity to connect. if you're having a fallen and a tabloid -- table
for instance we see for example that the list of bases includes the dimona nuclear facility in israel which has a u.s. base attached to it that has 120 soldiers. but when you look at the list of where the soldiers are it isn't listed so it's like wait a minute, what's going on here? it's become very opaque. is very hard to get good numbers. >> host: let's show some have stats from the defense department on u.s. military personnel deployment. obviously the united states and its territories have the most at 1.2 million afghanistan with the ongoing actions there, 66,000 troops. talk about the next two, germany and japan, why we need 53,000 troops in germany and 39,000 troops still in japan these days? >> guest: we don't. that's a simple answer. they should be brought home. >> host: what is their mission there right now? >> guest: their mission is left over from the cold war. these were troops that were placed there to prevent a soviet attack on eastern europe. there is no more tzipi at union and there is no more cold war. we don't face that kind of threat. in japan we are being told that they are
that israel. i think that is true. studs terkel said americans get up and go to work every day is much for daily meaning as for daily bread. he could have easily added daily identity. so it's no surprise that many people are looking for a new amalgam around work in the stage of life. they need income to be sure but they are also looking for daily identity for work that mean something beyond themselves. we have been calling that an encore career, work in the second half of life that is an intersection of passion, and a paycheck. already 9 million americans are engaged in careers in the second half of life. 31 million more give top priority to make in that transition that are struggling to what's next. it's essentially become a do-it-yourself process for so many people who are trying to get to this aspiration which is not only going to benefit them but i think has great potential payoff for the nation. i think it's a as a society we need to come together and develop better pathways to help people navigate their way into this stage of life. i think one place to start is with what we do fo
and shorter. not only do we see china, israel, others have drones' now, saudi arabia has drones now, we are probably going to be dealing with the other side of that. we are daily dealing with cyber attacks on our infrastructure. the answer to your question is, it can reinforce the existing power structures but it can also empower non-stage actors far faster than we get reinforced. >> i would say that his point is a fair one except, coming back to us, i think we have kept ourselves still in this environment of being extremely competitive. you reference an area that is a key one for the united states, and that is energy. the united states is number one in natural gas. the united states has been working very aggressively in ensuring that it is energy independent. just the other day, "the wall street journal" highlighted that the united states has grown exponentially in terms of its own oil production. i think we're going to see more of that. you were describing an important range of changes, but another one this going to matter in terms of the overall geopolitical calculation and our provi
. >> for the first time in 40 years, my left hand did this. >> israel. it works. >> you are an idealist. >> it is about seeing the world for what it can be and not what it is. >> ready, set, go. >> oh my god! >> plenty of life on the seafloor. >> wow. the only way off is up. >> the world according to sean. >> it is not sad. >> there is a seductive nature to the music. >> it is the story of a people and it grabs you. yes. >> it is not my cup of tea. >> we could have had it all >> what should i call you? >> i did not want to wear clothes today. >> on the stage, you are a seductress. where did you learn that? >> i am a woman. life experiences. >> such a flaky person. >> action. >> you think some day we will be 3d? >> we will have the same interview but in 38. >> god help us all. >> look at this. >> oh! >> what am i going to do? shut up? you will never shut me up. >> how are you doing? >> i am doing well. good to see you. >> "60 minutes." >> i am anderson cooper. >> we will be back next week with another edition of "60 minutes." >> next, on "60 minutes." woohoo! >> thanks. as you can tell,
and we have geopolitics and israel saying they won't take direct hits from syria. that is something that the market has been watching very closely as well. the big story that has long-term ramifications for the u.s. oil industry and for the global energy trade is definitely the report today from the international energy agency where they said that they believe that the u.s. will become the top oil producer in the world by 2020. overtaking saudi arabia. overtaking russia and the fact that u.s. will be self-sufficient by 2035. this is a huge sea change in the debate that we've been hearing about the dependence on foreign oil, about green energy and the fact that we're looking at this share revolution is having an impact not only on oil markets but natural gas markets here in the u.s. and international energy agency highlighting this in their report. back to you. >> thank you very much. shares of disney getting an upgrade after getting battered last week. citi upgrading from buy to neutral. they are saying that lucas films acquisition will weigh short terms on profits but it paves the
. >> are you concerned about is real? >> interesting, israel has a lot at stake, but they are also an independent decision maker. they have their own interest in this and have made it clear that they are not prepared to except without some of the military action iran with a clear path to a nuclear weapon. one scenario would be for the illustration to try to engage with the iranians diplomatically. with the other countries involved in the so called p five. offering a robust disclosure to the iranians if there regime will give up its nuclear program. to test them, to see if there is a diplomatic outcome that is accessible. if there is not, i think that that process will be important for the administration to set up options following the failure,, or the iranian regime. i would be very much on the lower end of military options. as part of the scenario of giving them over to give up weapons, it is that kind of scenario development i would try, which is the direction we're heading in at this point. dennis is going to speak to you later this morning, he is terrific on this subject and yo
overseas that were once here. the other reality is automation israel. my wife, when we were still dating -- automation is real. my wife, but we were still diggiating, was a banker. now you can take a picture of your check and deposit it. the political leadership that understands yoa government that spends more money than they take in will run into trouble fast. if the tax rates are too high, it discourages people from investing. they are unpredictable -- unpredictable, it scares them away. you want your water to be drinkable, your air to be breathable. you what will the people have to follow. if you are not weigh the cost of the regulation with the impact positive or negative it will have, you will have that regulations. we do not have any of that. government is contributing to this climate of poor growth. you look at the fiscal cliff. you know who made that? congress made that. the idea that each have an enormous tax increases at the same time we have a dramatic cuts in spending, that is the same time all these tax breaks expire and the spending goes down. that was not an accident. cong
for a traveler. all that stuff israel. if you had a phone with you, you could press a button and legal little trail there. when you showed up you could see that this is what people had done. that starts to be a compelling way of thinking how computers cancer to be more of a conduit of the lenses of your friends in the people you trust and anybody in the world rather than an internet connection with a screen on top of it. >> won the presuppositions of that is that you need a persistent identity that is attached to every person in your life. that has a memory. this thing has to be searchable and be in place over all the times in troops and things. the uc that as a novel view of identity or are you replicating something that is occurring in the real world? >> so phones are something you have with you all the time. you only have one phone and you do not share with people. your the one person who uses your phone unless you are sharing some 1's photograph. it contains all your information. the applications you use. facebook, we think about it as an opportunity to connect. if you're having a fallen
in israel where diversity visas were received. or albania where we went to war to ensure the integrity and the saving of those people. or hungary or iceland, or maybe our strong ally, turkey. that's what diversity visas represent. and there is no reason to borrow from peter to pay paul f my friends would really pay attention to the recent charge of the november 6 election, they would know what america needs is comprehensive immigration reform. if i might in this debate of deficit reduction and the need for increased revenue, we know that if you had comprehensive immigration reform over 10 years, you would introduce them to the economy -- into the economy $1.5 trillion. that's a reason to come to the floor right now and vote this bill down and start in the next week and put on the floor the bills that mr. gutierrez and myself and many others at one time senator mccain, wanted to put on the floor of the senate and the house. my concern is that we try to come in a bipartisan manner. i introduced legislation, an amendment in the markup to say that let's study this issue of fraud with diver
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